books 

Ice

1997

Ice is a destructive journey of insanity and love taking place in different places around the world between the years 1970 and 2031 – the lifetime of the protagonist, Ice. It is a book about obsessive and destructive love, which isn’t altered by geographical borders, time or rationalizations. It is love that is at times blissful, but is always on the verge of horror.


          Ice is a romantic psychopath, an exposed and obtuse person, a tough and difficult child and a passionate adult. He is passive-aggressive, as cruel as he is compassionate, and he loves as powerfully as he hates. Ice lives in a world that is alienated and violent, and the characters surrounding him seem detached and frustrated as himself.


          The novel is narrated in an unconventional way, using varied formats of storytelling and flowing along with its own internal logic and not in an obvious chronological order. Each chapter finds the protagonist at a different stage in his life and stands almost independently from the other chapters in the book.

story 

reviews 

"A depressing, thrilling novel, well worth reading." Ynet

 

"Ice is not only a novel about violence. Not at all. It is mainly a novel about obsessive and destructive love. Love that is not altered by geographical borders and doesn’t depend on time, or surrender to rationalizations… There is something in the violence, in the broken story and in its post-modernism, that reminds of Tarrantino." Pi Ha’aton Magazine

 

"Ice describes a world which is alienated and violent, and characters who are detached and frustrated. The atmosphere recalls at times the books of American Bret Easton Ellis, Scottish Irvine Welsh, and Canadian inventor of Cyberpunk, William Gibson. There is also an attempt in Ice to describe the gloomy atmosphere hovering over young westerners at the end of the twentieth century." Ha’ir Magazine

A version of the last chapter, “Opposite the Water, 2031″, won the Science Fiction Short Stories Award of the daily newspaper Yediot Achronot, 1997.

awards